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New Kanye Produced Album Raps About Vaccine Side Effects, Police Brutality, Kaepernick

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New Kanye Produced Album Raps About Vaccine Side Effects, Police Brutality, Kaepernick

Kanye West continues to be the center of controversy in the celebrity world with his latest produced album, Nasir. Nasir is the latest album by the rapper, Nas, who is often known for his intellectual lyrics which typically comment on social issues. Nasir’s lyrics seem to keep with the trend, remarking on issues heavily centered around police brutality and life in American poverty.

There is social commentary in his latest lyrics regarding Colin Kaepernick’s controversial kneeling protests, as well as commentary over the recent Starbucks issue where two black men were arrested for loitering at a Philadelphia location.

But he also takes aim at vaccine issues, something that’s not ultimately too foreign for the rapper. And something very likely to upset the mainstream apple cart.

“I thought you would protect me from this scary place?/Why’d you let them inject me?” The rapper sings, describing the act of vaccination as essentially a horrendous, painful, and potentially forced act.

“Who’s gonna know how these side effects is gonna affect me?”

Here’s the verse in full.

From the birth of a child, the world is foul
Excursions of a searchin’ child
Should learn to take nothin’ personal
A parent hates to watch his baby’s face
Takin’ his first immunization shots, but this is great
The child’s introduction to suffering and pain
Undestands without words
Nothin’ is explained or rushed to the brain
Lookin’ up at his parent’s face
Like, “I thought you would protect me from this scary place?”
“Why’d you let them inject me?”
“Who’s gonna know how these side effects is gonna effect me?”

Anti-vaccine concepts and support are not new to Nas, who is originally from Queens, New York. Nas was especially critical of vaccines on his 2001 album titled, Stillmatic. The song, “what goes around,” described vaccines as poison.


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Hey yo it’s poison, ecstasy, coke
You say it’s love, it is poison
Schools where I learned they should be burned, it is poison
Physicians prescripting us medicine which is poison
Doctors injecting our infants with the poison
Religion misoverstood is poison
Niggas up in my hood be getting shot giving poison
In hospitals, shots rittle the block
Little children and elderly women run for their lives
Drizzling rain come out the sky every time somebody dies,
Must be out my fucking mind, what is this, the hundredth time?
Sending flowers to funerals, reading rest in peace
You know the usual, death comes in threes
Life is short is what some nigga said
Not if you measure life by how one lives and what he did
It’s funny…

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vDZY25hnLo4

Kanye West continues to be a lightning rod either through his own statements and art or via his strong associations, such as the albums he produces. His newly notable relationship with Turning Point executive and Fox News contributor, Candace Owens, has stirred controversy in the black community and amongst liberals who fear West could be turning blacks against Democrats.

With contentious November midterm elections set to potentially reshape the American political system, Kanye’s rhetoric is being considered destructive to liberals in an unusually amplified manner. Liberals have strongly contended that mandatory vaccines are necessary for the greater good of our country. They’ve also done historically well at the polls with the black vote. With more and more people questioning the system, liberals chances at overtaking the House could be in jeopardy.

Feature image by: David Shankbone, CC BY 3.0

Coup d’Oreille

Author: Jim Satney

PrepForThat’s Editor and lead writer for political, survival, and weather categories.


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