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Typhoid Fever Spreads To LAPD As They Battle Homeless Crisis

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Typhoid Fever Spreads To LAPD As They Battle Homeless Crisis

A Los Angeles Police Department detective has been diagnosed with typhoid fever. According to health officials, at least five other officers may be infected, also. The officers work at the Central Division Station, which was fined for unsanitary working conditions this month. It is unclear if the typhoid case and the working conditions are related.

Officers working this precinct are also subjected to dealing with Los Angeles’ infamous Skid Row. Skid Row is a homeless section of Los Angeles that host hundreds of encampments. The section is notoriously unsanitary. Last week, Dr. Drew Pinksy claimed that the Bubonic Plague is likely already in the area. Between Dr. Drew’s statement and the recent typhoid fever case, many are growing concerned that Los Angeles is ripe for a pandemic. It is unlikely that the city is prepared to deal with a large-scale pandemic if that were to be the case.

The LAPD says they’ve disinfected the station. A full review is underway to determine the cause of the original case. The five officers are being monitored for further typhoid fever symptoms.

Los Angeles Is Ripe For a Pandemic

The city of Los Angeles is battling numerous issues, including mass homelessness. In fact, the entire state’s homeless issue has reduced many middle-class Californian’s to living in their cars.

https://files.hudexchange.info/resources/documents/2018-AHAR-Part-1.pdf

photo credit: U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development

Illnesses derived from flea and feces origins are on the rise. The situation could prompt the next big pandemic event if health officials aren’t careful.

It isn’t just typhoid fever or the plague that’s of concern in LA. The city is also experiencing a rise in typhus. In 2008, there were a mere 13 reported cases of typhus. In 2018, that number rose to 167.


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The outbreak scenarios all begin and end with the out of control homeless population growth. In fact, the issue is so severe that nearly 30% of all homeless people can be found in California, according to the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development.

And this horrendous situation is showing no indications of improving as the state’s politicians continue to propose tax plans that wipe out the middle class.

The situation is taxing police officers who are vastly understaffed in dealing with rising crime. Compared to the rest of the country, particularly the further east you go, California’s police patrol is almost half what other states are. It can’t keep up with criminal activity.

One LAPD officer said that “about 60% of our calls every day are about transients and problems that they cause.”

Police officers are tested when complaint calls involving homeless people hit their radios. Often the officers do nothing.

The state’s attempt to relieve the prison population forced many inmates from state prisons to county jails. This created severe county jail overpopulations, which forced those jails to release more and more people. Many of those people have severe drug issues. Now they are down and out on skid row, increasing the risks for drug use spread diseases and crime.

California also passed Prop. 57 which reduced many violent offender statuses to non-violent offender status.

It’s all amounting to a dramatic and terrifying rise in homeless encampments. These encampments are infested with rats that carry illnesses. In other words, diseases are spreading. Illnesses once considered “third world issues” are now commonplace in California. The entire state is a pandemic tinderbox and there doesn’t seem to be any reasonable solutions in the matter.

About Typhoid Fever

Typhoid Fever is spread via contaminated water and food. It is considered rare with fewer than 20,000 cases annually in the United States. Imaging and lab tests are often used to confirm a diagnosis. Symptoms may alleviate after a few weeks time. Travelers are often given typhoid fever vaccines. Typhoid fever symptoms include headache, diarrhea, stomach pains, and a high fever. Patients are typically treated with antibiotics.

Author: Jim Satney

PrepForThat’s Editor and lead writer for political, survival, and weather categories.


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