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Vermont Lawmakers To Amend 5G Bill Due To Health Concerns

5G health risks News

Vermont Lawmakers To Amend 5G Bill Due To Health Concerns

Vermont lawmakers will amend a new broadband bill over 5G health concerns. The bill aims to increase 5G capability throughout Vermont, but opponents argue that 5G technology is yet to be proven safe. They claim that 5G cell phone service will overexpose people to dangerous radio frequency radiation.

As a happy medium, lawmakers will allow for a state health review into 5G’s potential health risks.

Many people believe that our society is already overexposed to radio waves from wireless networks in nearly all offices and homes. Following the passage of the bill in the state’s House, people turned out to protests.

“People are really afraid of this 5G network, and it’s not just in Vermont,” said Annette Smith, executive director of Vermonters for a Clean Environment, per vpr.org.

“There are plenty of places that are saying: ‘Wait a minute we can’t go deploying something that has never been put out in the public before and that the industry admits haven’t done health studies about.” She continued.

Smith has a point. Other communities are rising up to voice concerns over 5G technology.

People in Rhode Island are finding 5G devices installed on street lamps through towns. Portland’s mayor attempted to block 5G technology until more safety reviews could be completed. Sprint recently shut down a California 5G tower following protests over increased childhood cancer rates.



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5G allows more data to be sent from device to device, but it’s not a very optimal frequency. 5G has a difficult time traveling great distances or penetrating building walls. Because of this, 5G technology must be installed in a more dense manner.

But telecommunication companies claim that 5G radio frequencies compare to baby monitor radio waves.

Oregon Senators have heard the protests and are now responding with tougher 5G measures.

“The number of phone calls and the concern has kind of slowed the process down,” Senator Ann Cummings said. “I think what we’re planning on doing is just saying right now that anything that would have to do with 5G, any kind of a cell system, has to go through either Act 250 or have a 248 hearing.”

Act 250 forces an environmental criteria review for new technology projects.

Cummings says that rural areas aren’t the target of 5G technology installations, rather, more densely populated areas.

“It just technologically won’t work in smaller, more rural areas, so it’s not coming,” she said.

Cummings also takes issue with cell antennas being installed on Vermont utility poles without proper approval.

Vermont’s second-look at 5G health concerns is another fallen domino in the war against 5G. Communities all over the world are questioning the legitimacy of telecommunication companies and government agencies that claim 5G is harmless.

Author: Jim Satney

PrepForThat’s Editor and lead writer for political, survival, and weather categories.


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